Monmouth pottery crock. How Do You Identify an Antique Stoneware Crock? 2019-02-05

Monmouth pottery crock Rating: 5,2/10 632 reviews

Monmouth Pottery Stoneware Three Gallon Crock Jug : EBTH

monmouth pottery crock

Early wares were salt-glaze and Albany slip glaze with hand drawn cobalt markings, but they quickly switched to a number of stenciled and stamped markings along with switching to a bristol glaze. Western Stoneware would put advertising on about anything the customer wanted although bowls, jugs, beater jars and pitchers seem to be the most common. This division was discontinued during the Great Depression of the 1930s. Some of the most sought after pieces are wares with advertising on them, merchants would special order wares with their business name printed on them to give away as premiums or to put their products in. Western Stoneware would put advertising on about anything the customer wanted although bowls, jugs, beater jars and pitchers seem to be the most common.

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How Do You Identify an Antique Stoneware Crock?

monmouth pottery crock

Antique stoneware crocks have marks and symbols that collectors can use to trace the origins. Plant 1 or 2 or whatever number of the seven plants that had produced it. Very old pieces have crude designs with few lines and very little detail. They produced many lines of stoneware and pottery, from the basic utilitarian wares as crocks, butter churns, jugs and water coolers to decorative pieces of art pottery, even pottery lamps and various flower pots and planters, basically almost anything that could be produced from clay was made by Western Stoneware. Culbertson Stoneware Company became Plant Five in the merger and was in production until 1916.

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Illinois Stoneware

monmouth pottery crock

It has two paper labels, one on the bottom and one on the side; both say Monmouth Pottery. It started existence as a standard 7 inch tall Cattail pitcher which should have had a handle applied on its back. Item Details A Monmouth Pottery stoneware crock jug, marked No. The Monmouth Pottery Company of Monmouth, Illinois began production in 1894 producing a wide range of utilitarian wares, crock jars, jugs, stoneware bowls and churns etc. Macomb Pottery Company of Macomb, Illinois The Macomb Pottery Co. Nineteenth-century anchor designs are more elaborate and intricate.

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Antique Monmouth

monmouth pottery crock

This plant was destroyed by fire in 1913 and never rebuilt. The Monmouth Pottery Company was in operation until 1905 when it was sold, it was soon to become one of the seven plants of the Western Stoneware Co. Until 1906 when it was purchased by Western Stoneware Co. In 1906 the Western Stoneware Co. Hands and arms are most common, often clutching swords or arrows. Many of the early Western Stoneware vessels such as crocks and jugs were marked with the maple leaf logo that now read: Western Stoneware Co.

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Monmouth pottery

monmouth pottery crock

This new company kept the same style of maple leaf logo that the Monmouth Pottery Company had used previously. Early wares were salt-glaze and albany slip glaze with hand drawn cobalt markings, but they quickly switched to a number of stenciled and stamped markings along with switching to a bristol glaze. Lori points out that a more artistically rendered design on a stoneware crock is likely to raise the value of the vessel. Many of these wares were unsigned by the manufacturer and can be a little difficult to identify if you are not an avid collector. Its mark, the maple leaf was used until 1930. Over the years the Western Stoneware Company has seen several changes in ownership, the most recent in 2006 after their 100 year anniversary.

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Monmouth pottery

monmouth pottery crock

The Monmouth Pottery Company began in 1894 and was located in Monmouth, Illinois, producing useful items like butter churns, crocks and jars. Shown in the video below is Jack Horner, Current President Western Stoneware. This was a very popular way of advertising and several potteries produced advertising pieces such as the Watt Pottery Co. Newer vessels are likely to be coated inside with a brown finish known as Albany slip. Many of the early Western Stoneware vessels such as crocks and jugs were marked with the maple leaf logo that now read: Western Stoneware Co. Fort Dodge Stoneware of Fort Dodge, Iowa Was formed in 1892, became Plant Seven and was destroyed by fire in 1906, less than a year after the merger and was not rebuilt. Through the years the maple leaf logo as seen a few variations and there were also several different bottom markings and various stamps that were used to mark their wares, but many pieces were unmarked.

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How Do You Identify an Antique Stoneware Crock?

monmouth pottery crock

If the piece was made after 1891, it also bears the country of origin. During this period they were also producing advertising pieces, miniatures, stoneware pigs and cow and calves. Company names usually accompany these unique marks, making it easier for the collector to date the individual piece. Stoneware and pottery were produced here until 1956 when the plant was sold. Through the years the maple leaf logo as seen a few variations and there were also several different bottom markings and various stamps that were used to mark their wares, but many pieces were unmarked. Stoneware pottery from the 1700s that hails from Europe may bear the symbol of an anchor. Michael I have a dull green classic-style urn, 6.

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Monmouth Stoneware for sale

monmouth pottery crock

In the decades following the war, Americans established stoneware factories in New York, Pennsylvania and New Jersey. German and Old English pottery may exhibit a crown or a shield as its manufacturing mark. At any rate we are fortunate indeed this novel piece has survived 100+ years, we are truly enriched by its existence. Pottery or stoneware marked with foreign alphabets are difficult to trace. This is also where the Cardinal Brand of redware was produced. Human body parts or mythical creatures are often indicative of pottery made in the 19th or 20th century.

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Western Stoneware (Warren County)

monmouth pottery crock

This was a very popular way of advertising and several potteries produced advertising pieces such as the Watt Pottery Co. Many of these wares were unsigned by the manufacturer and can be a little difficult to identify if you are not an avid collector. These pieces if unsigned, as many were, can easily be confused with the examples made by the Red Wing Union Stoneware Co. Perhaps it was intended as a gag gift, or a shelf piece never to be functionally used but only admired, generating lively and lengthy discussions. . The seven companies that merged together in 1906 are: 1. I will try to get you a fair retail price and If I am unable to help you I can offer some additional ideas on ways to appraise your ceramic collectibles.

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